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Kamandi, The Last Boy on Earth, Issue 3, Page 1

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John S.'s picture
Posted by: John S. | November 3, 2012

Design

Superb overall design by Jack and Mike on this beautiful splash page!

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | November 3, 2012

Jack in command

Tis a beaut, I tell ye.

ken bastard's picture
Posted by: ken bastard | November 3, 2012

Mike's choice...

...of open borders was always one of my faves.

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | November 3, 2012

About open borders

Usually works better when artwork is contained within the frame--in this pic the lasso is broken up and part of the knee guard on ape man is cut off. This is a case where I think borders are needed. I do like the open panels also but not in this case. Although when in color it completes it more and makes it work better.

John S.'s picture
Posted by: John S. | November 3, 2012

Re: Open Borders

This page could have definitely benefitted from modern, full-bleed printing techniques. Ideally, the borders should have terminated completely at the top of the rocky area. The lasso, knee-guards and Kamandi's thought balloon probably should have been rendered all the way out, with no border indicators on them. If you look at the printed comic (which is a beautifully drawn issue, by the way), you'll notice that there seems to be a bit too much space wasted in the bottom margin, beneath the indicia. It's unfortunate that it took as long as it did for the production people in comics to come to grips with the issues of page-alignment and bleed art; but in spite of the shortcomings, early-seventies comics generally had decent printing and I think Jack and Mike did a good job with more adventurous layouts like this one, despite the limited technology that was available to them at the time.

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | November 4, 2012

With borders

Tom hooked me up with a link.

Here's how this page would look with borders containing the art. Now the lasso doesn't look so broken up being framed in and Kamandi's thought balloon doesn't look so out of place floating there cut off on one side. I took the liberty and ran the top border line behind the title and leaving the caption at top open without borders which makes for a nice style design.

http://whatifkirby.com/kamandi-panelborder.jpg

Johnny S. wrote, "This page could have definitely benefited from modern, full-bleed printing techniques. Ideally, the borders should have terminated completely at the top of the rocky area. The lasso, knee-guards and Kamandi's thought balloon probably should have been rendered all the way out, with no border indicators on them".

I did one like John suggests here also and it looks good that way too. And as John says this is applied to modern comics and wouldn't been done that way back then. It was a nice exercise regardless.

John S.'s picture
Posted by: John S. | November 4, 2012

Borderlines

Excellent work, Frank. Running the top border line behind the title lettering and leaving the caption open that way was something I didn't even think of. It looks superb and neatly unifies the entire composition without violating Jack's creative intent in the least. And as you say, it's a solution that could have been done back in the early seventies when this page was originally drawn. Great job!!

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | November 4, 2012

Page design

Thanks John.

I'm all about page design myself and how panels work on a page. It was usually at Mike's discretion whether to open the panels the way he did and he did do it quite often to great effect--especially on paneled pages.

Another thing I liked that Mike did when lettering, he would open a word balloon to the gutter or margin which looked good in a page design. I don't know if Mike was one of the first to do that but that technique is used a lot now-a-days.

John S.'s picture
Posted by: John S. | November 4, 2012

Re: Page Design

Yeah, comics sure have come a long way in terms of page design since those days. Stuff that was considered really radical back then is now just average, everyday procedure!

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | November 10, 2012

HMW

It's not page 4 but rather page 1, issue 3.

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