Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | October 19, 2012

Blastaar Blasts Bastard!

Who would deny that this era was, in fact, the Kirby Age?
Gorgeous!

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | October 19, 2012

re: Blastaar Blasts Bastard!

Agreed!

ken bastard's picture
Posted by: ken bastard | October 19, 2012

Stan...

... certainly was long-winded wasn't he? Tip-o-the-hat to Sam Rosen for fitting in all that copy so nicely.

pat ford's picture
Posted by: pat ford (not verified) | October 20, 2012

Awkward and STILTED

How anyone can stomach reading dialogue this bad is beyond my comprehension.

ken bastard's picture
Posted by: ken bastard | October 20, 2012

Re; Awkward

It's just of it's time I think, Pat.

Winokur's picture
Posted by: Winokur | October 23, 2012

But in the person of the

But in the person of the Thing, Stan was sending up the dialogue! Marvel at its finest.

The thing that's hard for me to take is how Stan suddenly decided he felt insecure about the story being fantasy and not hard Sci-Fi, so he wrote that silly note about how they can understand each other's language.

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | October 20, 2012

Eating Words

Hey, as a kid, I've been a glutton for such logorrhea!
Besides, I still find this page quite readable, Stan has wrote worse, cornier dialogue than this!

patrick ford's picture
Posted by: patrick ford | October 24, 2012

I don't understand some people

Hard Science Fiction and Space Opera both had to deal with the issue of how alien races were able to communicate with each other. There's the "We've been studying you" explanation. The Universal Translator, mental telepathy.
It's odd when fans of super hero comic books get worked up about things they think "aren't real." Complaints of the, "It isn't realistic" variety often come from fans who dress up as their favorite super hero when attending comic book conventions. It's kind of funny to see people get worked up over Galactus having a "G" on his armor while being completely fine with a guy who is on fire, and another guy who can stretch. And there are balloons with words in them floating around in almost every panel. It's a super hero comic book. A fantasy from the word go. Fantasy is just fine. Do people laugh at Aesop because he's got talking animals in his fables. What about Carl Barks? It's cringe worth I guess? I mean he's got ducks walking around with coats, but no pants, and they are talking to ancient Egyptians and Incas.

Winokur's picture
Posted by: Winokur | October 24, 2012

Yes, I completely agree. I do

Yes, I completely agree. I do think the "G" kinds of shoves it in people's face though, and threatens the suspension of disbelief. But with this page it's Stan whodunnit!

patrick ford's picture
Posted by: patrick ford | October 24, 2012

It's unbelivable

I don't know. The idea a person is reading the FF and believing it until they see a "G' on the armor of Galactus is hard to fathom. I've heard about this "suspension of belief" and have never been able to relate to the idea. Even as a small child it never occurred to me super hero comic books, or other forms of fantasy were supposed to be believable. It just seems to me if you're looking for realism fantasy is not the place to look for it. Things like a good biography or a book on a historical event are favorites of mine. Actually the whole concept of super hero comics is so weird and unreal that any attempt at realism comes off as campy. Kirby's art and writing work for me because they operate on the level of the Brothers Grimm.

Winokur's picture
Posted by: Winokur | October 27, 2012

No one is going to read or

No one is going to read or watch something that comes off as nonsense.

It has to make sense on a certain level. Different people have different thresholds.

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