Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 3, 2011

An oasis in the desert

There you go Krackles--finally some relief. And your favorite Kirby inker too--Frank Giacoia.

But guess who takes over the inking chores after this issue?

*This is where the shrill violins and cellos kick in from the movie Psycho.*

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 3, 2011

Drinking the ink

Nothing could quench a FF thirst more efficiently than Kirby inked by Giacioa no matter what happens after!

Thanks, Tom :-)

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 3, 2011

The big 700 is zooming in!

I wonder which page will celebrate this event?
Even better : will Tom cook up something very special for the big 1000?

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 3, 2011

Bulletproof

Hey, Frank! You know why Giacoia is obviously such a great inker?

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 3, 2011

Could it be--?

Frank Giacoia was almost as true to Kirby as Royer was. Frank really didn't deviant from the pencils. And getting as pure to Jack as one can is always a good thing.

Royer got there more then anybody.

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 3, 2011

Yes, he was true to Kirby…

…and true to himself.
Royer was truer than anybody, in fact, truer than it should have been possible.

Frank was a great inker because his work was equally as good each and every time.
He would enhance mediocre pencils or raise himself to the level of the best ones.

Whoever the artist, whatever the style or genre, name it and you will find that Giacoia always did top notch work.
He didn't have to sacrifice his own style to do justice to the pencils he inked.

He could merge with any penciller's style while being respectul of both artist specific strentgh.
I would add that, except for a few ones like Royer or Sinnott, you couldn't find many inkers able to match his bold brushwork!
Royer displayed an incredible level of control and accuracy to respect, in every aspect, the pencils.
Sinnott formula was leaning on rendering things "prettier" and slick.

Frank Giacoia inking would be empowered by, and in the same process, would match stroke for stroke the very essence of Kirby gorgeous pencils.

John S.'s picture
Posted by: John S. | July 3, 2011

Those are excellent observations, Krackles

Whether Giacoia was inking Kirby, John Romita, Gil Kane, Jim Steranko, Neal Adams, Ross Andru, or anyone else, he always respected the pencils without sacrificing his own style. Little wonder his work was so well liked by so many pencillers.

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 3, 2011

What a list, John!

You sure did pick up some of the best.
Let's not forget one artist that Frank Giacoia did ink beautifully, the great Gene Colan!
Sadly, he passed away a few days ago but he will be fondly remembered.

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 3, 2011

What John S. said, Krackles

You articulated it well Krackles. Frank G. also did some awesome inks on the very hard to ink late Gene Colan. There was nothing really showy about Frank's inks but he was one of the best. He could ink anyone as Johnny S. says. Frank Giacoia deserves more recognition.

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 3, 2011

What a list!

There you go again Krackles--beating me to the punch.

Gene Colan was a giant--he is legendary.

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 3, 2011

Wait until I let you know more…

… About how I warmed up to the work of the one that should remain nameless!

Just to add infortune to your injury, I own a Murdock (Daredevil) pencils page by Colan.
I wrote him an email a few years ago. I was hoping he could identify which issue it was intended for but no such luck as he could only certify it as his work.

A giant, yes and one with a talent so unique we certainly won't see the like anymore.

John S.'s picture
Posted by: John S. | July 3, 2011

Genial Gene

Yeah, I forgot about Gene the Dean! Feerless Frank was great on his stuff! One of the few who could effectively handle Colan's art. (Others I liked were Tom Palmer and Jack Abel. They really knew how to translate Gene's gray tones into hard line.)

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 3, 2011

THERE'S an inker

Tom Palmer--wonder how he would of handled Jack? Kirby/Palmer. Now THAT could be some interesting recreations.

John S.'s picture
Posted by: John S. | July 3, 2011

Terrific Tom Palmer

Yeah, he had tremendous flexibility in his inks -- good thicks and thins. He was great with the black-spotting, too, and did a really fine job conveying the mood and atmosphere of Colan's stuff, especially on TOMB OF DRACULA. It might be cool to see him recreate a page or two from something like the first issue of SPIRIT WORLD -- so we could compare it to the published version by the Unmentionable Inker.

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 3, 2011

I wonder?

Hey Tom--would it even be possible to get Tom Palmer to do something in recreations? Would he even be interested in doing something like that? Of all the inkers back then, it's surprising that Tom P. never inked Jack.

John, that's a good call on the potential pages that could be recreated--SPIRIT WORLD. Are there any pencils from that?

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 3, 2011

And,,,

"In the Days of the Mob" could be good potential Tom Palmer recreations.

John S.'s picture
Posted by: John S. | July 3, 2011

Spirit World Pencils

Thanks, Frank. I don't know if there are any pencil photocopies from SPIRIT WORLD. I've never seen any, so I kind of doubt it. I think Jack turned that book in before he got his home copier. Same with MOB. Too bad, 'cause Vinnie's inks on SPIRIT WORLD are very inconsistent -- ranging from really good in some panels to absolutely atrocious in others -- with the overall quality being what I would classify as "rather mediocre" (although I'm sure Krackles would say I'm being charitable with that assessment). If there aren't any SPIRIT WORLD or MOB photocopies out there, I think it would also be nice to see Palmer take a crack at some DEMON pages -- not because of any problems with Mike's superlative inks, but just because Palmer had a knack for inking both superhero and horror stuff, and THE DEMON combined elements of both.

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 3, 2011

Just another take

This shouldn't be about one inker showing up another--it'd just be interesting to see another inkers take on some of this stuff. Tom Palmer inking some pages that Joe Sinnott did would be cool also. Imagine Palmer's inks on FF 49--there's a lot of pencils of that. The Demon would really be cool too. "Phantom of the Sewers" comes to mind. There's pencils of that.

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 3, 2011

Y'know...?

Before we get too carried away with the inking dream for Jack, a lot of these guys don't do it for nothing. They would treat it as a commission, and that can get pretty costly. And besides, as some may want to ink Jack--there may be some with the attitude "why bother, it's been done already".

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 4, 2011

The palm on the brush

Guys, Tom Palmer is a great inker, no question but I suspect there was a reason why he never inked Kirby.
His style has an illustrative feel to it that suited "realistic drawing ". I believe, it wouldn't match so well with Kirby's distinctive cartoonish pencils or he would overpower Kirby because it's a natural tendancy for his style to come through.

If the idea tempt you to see great inkers inking Kirby, don't forget the Jack Kirby Collector is already doing this kind of study and homage.

For me, WhatifKirby is focused on Kirby original art with the occasional Mike Royer's recreation or should I say salvation?
Also, not trying to get a cheap shot against the One that Should Remain Nameless for Eternity but I would guess that Mike's recreation is a pet project of Tom whose promise is : what if Mike Royer did ink it instead of the Nameless one? LOL!

Ha, in the end, I'm as curious as you but shouldn't recreations be reserved to recreate mediocre original versions? Which is another way of phrasing WIK promise (Here's when Erik is jumping in…).

What's your opinion, Tom?

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 4, 2011

Deep pockets

That's the right moment for Tom to pass amongst you guys and collect donations.

Tom Kraft's picture
Posted by: Tom Kraft | July 4, 2011

Re: Deep Pockets

You're correct, creations are not cheap. The least costly creations were about $200. Royer's page rate is $1,000. I get a small volume discount. Ayers was about half of Royer's cost. Sinnott's rate was double, $2,000 plus I have to have his pages lettered by someone else. Royer letter most of Joe's pages for $200 a page.

Besides enjoying recreating Kirby's pencils, financially, I had no choice if I wanted to do the number of creations I did from 1999-2004. Mike reduced his page rate 30 or 40 percent if I did the pencilling. Though I provided pencils to all the other inkers, there was no cost reductions for me doing the pencils.

I was and am very passionate to see Jack's powerful pencils, documented in his photocopies, get the best representation in ink.

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 4, 2011

My Kingdom…

… For a bottle of ink!

OK, you convinced me Tom, I'll get the brushes and the ink bottles out of the boxes gathering dust..

Tom Kraft's picture
Posted by: Tom Kraft | July 4, 2011

WiK Promise

Everyone has their preferences in inkers, mine wasn't, and I'll name the nameless one, Colletta. Today I've warmed to his interpretation of Jack's pencils on Thor and especially, The Tales of Asgard. I have a greater appreciation for the man after reading the recent book on him. I feel he put himself into extraordinary situations with deadlines and needed to mass produce the inking process in order to make as much money as he could to support his lifestyle and choices. In some instances he had the time and his artistic abilities shined through, in other cases he didn't and the end result suffered. This to me was unfortunate for Kirby after seeing the photocopies of Jack's pencils.

So my original intension with WiK was to say, "What if Royer started inking for Jack in 1961?," "What if Sinnott inked those early issues of Journey into Mystery?" that lead to What if Kirby. The plan was to have only inkers that originally inked Jack do the recreations, though this has opened to others recently. Royer did most of them because, frankly, I like his inking and faithfulness to Kirby's pencils. So to me that is the promise of WiK, to show everyone what if Kirby's pencils were inked by other Kirby inkers.

The addition of the gallery can be loosely applied to the promise. What if I had access to see hundreds of Kirby art up close. What if I could create my own virtual portfolio of Kirby art etc.

Much more to come on the site. Tom

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 4, 2011

The Palm on the brush

Krackles, I too was thinking along those lines why we never had the chance to see Palmer inks on Jack. But then I got to thinking how the two styles may mesh. Sure let the Palmer thing happen on Jack and see what comes out of it, ala Kirby/Woods--like from Sky Masters and Surf Hunter. It may prove to be interesting. Nice little dream I got goin', eh?
I wonder--has the Jack Kirby Collector considered Palmer?

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 4, 2011

WiK Promise

Yeah--I always thought it was more about the guys that originally inked Jack. I thank you Tom for letting me (however slight it may be) break the mold in participating in the Big Barda recreation. I'm honored you let me in.

Tom Kraft's picture
Posted by: Tom Kraft | July 4, 2011

I'm more than happy and

I'm more than happy and honored for your time and your wonderful art additions to this site.

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 4, 2011

*Sniff*

Man hug.

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 4, 2011

Weak delivery

Hey, Tom you just broke the Nameless One spell.
No misunderstanding, I was fooling around but I love the Wik promise !

I know that Colletta was the guy to go for when an editor had to meet a dreadful deadline and I do respect the man who had to support a family.

As a kid with a meager fluctuating allowance, I had to make choices and decide where to put my money. When faced with a tighter pocket, I would only buy every possible Kirby comics… except for Thor.
The work Colletta did was the reason why.

He had to make choices too, just like other fellow professional inkers did.
They apparently, didn't make the same ones as Colletta.

Unfortunately, I could already compare his work to Sinnott or Giacoia or Stone whom I suspect also had a family to support.
That's where my pocket money went.

Years later, thanks to magazines and internet I got access to behind the scene infos but what I learnt doesn't hide the fact that the stuff he inked was far from the quality I got used to and expected from a Kirby comic.

It was all about the work back then, and still is today, Vince Colletta never did it for my money.

Kirby always did. Despite Colletta, in the end.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.