Created Art

The Mighty Thor, Issue 152, Page 1, Greg Theakston

Kirby Pencils

The Mighty Thor, Issue 152, Page 1, Jack Kirby

Published Version

The Mighty Thor, Issue 152, Page 1, Published
Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 4, 2011

This one strikes me as a mighty job!

I like it and this is coming from someone who's been vocal enough against Mr Theakston inclination to "fix" Kirby's drawings.

Note to Tom :
As John S. and Frank Fosco pointed out, your pencils recreations are impressive and capture the wonder of Kirby's pencils.

One might say you really know your Kraft!

Did Mike Royer explain why he decided to work exclusively from his own pencils recreations? I'm curious to study enough of his to compare to yours because you set the bar pretty high.

Tom Kraft's picture
Posted by: Tom Kraft | July 4, 2011

Thank you

Thanks Krackle, John S. and Frank for your comments on my pencil recreations. It means a lot coming from you guys. Mike's feels that if he recreates the pencils, he can start planning out in his head how he'll ink them and feels he can produce a better end product.

I don't think he'd refuse a creation if he didn't pencil it but these days my full attention is on building up this site. I have little time left over to do the pencilling...At this point.

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 6, 2011

Sometimes things need fixin'

I like Vinnie's version. The way Thor's left arm is slung over the Destroyer's shoulder I think Vinnie got it looking more right then the pencil version and Greg following the pencil version. It looks awkward and almost fire hose like until Vinnie took those so-called liberties and fixed it.

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 6, 2011

Lost in translation

I must admit I don't quite understand what you mean about the arm, Frank.

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 6, 2011

I'll try and translate

The bicep on Thor's left arm is flattened and looks awkward lying on the Destroyer's shoulder. It is especially noticeable in Greg's inked version. Thor's arm laying like that, in the bicep looks like a flattened fire hose.

Vinnie caught this and bumped up and rounded the Destroyer's shoulder and shoulder blade to slightly overlap in front of Thor's bicep and forearm up to the wrist band. Vinnie got it to work. That doesn't make him a great inker, but it shows he's conscious of what he's doing.

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 6, 2011

Flex your muscles!

OK, I understand now, rounding up the shoulder makes it work from an anatomy point of view.
But, wasn't Kirby looking for a dynamic composition rather than anatomy? I prefer the tension he created with his bold strokes and I'm not bothered by the flatness (that I can see now) after you pointed it out.

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 6, 2011

Also...

...to let you know, I wasn't looking for this. I was looking at the new creation on this piece and that part of it caught my eye. Then I looked at what Colletta did and it obviously caught his eye too.

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 6, 2011

Join the Knuckles

OK for the shoulder but look at what he did to Thor's left hand.
Kirby drew some powerful ones that suits the action and the character while Colletta softens everyting and turns the fingers into a mass of blob!

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 6, 2011

Nit pick?

Not anatomy point of view--but looking right point of view. Kirby's anatomy was anatomy that he created and it was awesome. I don't think the tension is lost with the shoulder fix to get it looking more correct.

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 6, 2011

Hand it to you

Colletta got closer to that hand then Greg did.

And I gotta hand it to you Krackles--you're very creative at these subject titles--I can't keep up.

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 6, 2011

Pump up the volume

Yeah, anatomy isn't the right word it's more about the volume I guess.
Still, Kirby's version suits my eyes better.

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 6, 2011

Take five

You do good yourself, lol.

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 6, 2011

No pun intended

Wow, now it even comes without control!
I must be under some kind of spell.

Tom Kraft's picture
Posted by: Tom Kraft | July 6, 2011

Another interpretation

I also had Mike Royer ink this splash. I'll dig it up and see how he handled it.

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 6, 2011

Lead on, Tom!

Tom, do you have access to the pencils scans that we can look at in the JKC?

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 6, 2011

Perception

It's not a Colletta thing with me--he happen to see what I saw and in my opinion came up with a solution that worked.

Krackles's picture
Posted by: Krackles | July 6, 2011

A dent indentation

What happened to indentation?

John S.'s picture
Posted by: John S. | July 6, 2011

no doubt Mike's will be the best

I don't clearly remember Mike's version from the old site, but I'm sure it's much better than either of these, so I'm anxious to see it again. In my opinion, the ideal inker for a page like this would have been Frank Giacoia, but failing that, I'd take Royer over just about anyone. Gotta say, the only thing I really like from any of the versions shown here (aside from the King's magnificent pencilling, of course) is Sam Rosen's ever-excellent lettering. I've always believed that one of the things that made sixties Marvel comics so outstanding was the absolutely first-rate lettering they had from Artie Simek and Sam Rosen. Great lettering could make even mediocre pages look good, and when you combined it with great art like the King's, the results were nothing short of sensational.

Frank Fosco's picture
Posted by: Frank Fosco | July 6, 2011

A hands on fading craft in comics

Totally agree with you there Johnny S. Artie Simek and Sam Rosen were tops in their field. They set the standard for lettering. Especially Artie. I think Artie may have been Sam's mentor. Tis a craft unto itself. Back in the day when they use to actually letter on the boards. That doesn't happen very often anymore. Erik Larsen's book Savage Dragon is only one in a few books that still get's lettered on the boards.

Tom Kraft's picture
Posted by: Tom Kraft | July 6, 2011

Royer posted

John and all, I just posted the Mike Royer creation version done in 2001: http://www.whatifkirby.com/creations/mighty-thor-issue-152-page-1-0.

Compare and contrast!

John S.'s picture
Posted by: John S. | July 7, 2011

Lettering

Yeah, Artie was amazing. Easily one of the best ever. Probably my top three would be Howard Ferguson, Artie Simek and Gaspar Saladino, but I'd also rate Mike Royer, Sam Rosen, Todd Klein and DC's Golden Age logo designer Ira Schnapp very highly as well. You're right, Frank, hand lettering is a dying art, sadly. But I still much prefer good hand lettering over computer lettering any time.

Artistram3d1's picture
Posted by: Artistram3d1 | July 20, 2011

Simek and Sam Rosen lettering

Holy cow, I never would'a believed anyone else felt the same way about these two great letter artists! They are without a doubt my all time faves. I've tried doing research on them via Google, but I didn't find much. Does anyone on this site have any leads?

Dave Elliott's picture
Posted by: Dave Elliott | March 22, 2012

Kirby Muscle

I think over all Mike Royer's piece is the best, but Vinnie did get the shoulder/arm looking right. If you look closely at Jack's original pencils it was pretty much there. Greg took it one way, Vinnie another...

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
X