Steve Ditko

Steve Ditko studied at the Cartoonists and Illustrators School in New York City under Jerry Robinson and began professionally illustrating comic books in 1953. Much of his early work was for Charlton Comics (for whom he continued to work intermittently until the company’s demise in 1986), producing science-fiction, horror and mystery stories. In the late 1950s, he also began working for Atlas Comics, the 1950s precursor of Marvel Comics. Ditko and writer-editor Stan Lee created Spider-Man in Amazing Fantasy #15 (Aug. 1962), and shortly thereafter Doctor Strange, in Strange Tales #110 (July 1963). Ditko also drew many stories of the Hulk, first in the final issue of The Incredible Hulk (#6, March 1963), and then in Tales to Astonish, relaunching the character’s series in issue #60 (Oct. 1964) and continuing through #67 (May 1965, succeeded by Jack Kirby).

After leaving Marvel and Spider-Man in 1966, Ditko went to Charlton Comics, where he worked on Captain Atom, Blue Beetle, writer Joe Gill’s “Liberty Belle” (a backup feature in the comic E-Man), and Ditko’s own “Killjoy” (also in E-Man) and “The Question.” Also at Charlton, Ditko did much work on their sciencefiction and horror titles. In addition, Ditko drew 16 stories for Warren Publishing’s horror-comic magazines, most of which were done using ink-wash. By 1968, Ditko was producing work for DC Comics, creating or co-creating the Creeper and The Hawk and the Dove, then going back to Charlton through the mid-1970s. He returned to DC in the mid-1970s, then to Marvel in 1979, taking over Kirby’s Machine Man title and working on such titles as Rom, Spaceknight and Speedball.

Ditko retired from the mainstream in 1998. Since then, his strictly solo work has been published intermittently by independent publisher and long-time friend Robin Snyder, who was his editor at Charlton and Archie Comics. The Snyder-published books have included Static, The Missing Man, The Mocker and, more recently, Avenging World, a giant collection of stories and essays spanning 30 years. [source: www.comicbookdb.com]

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