Sol Brodsky

Sol Brodsky was born in Brooklyn and by age 17 was at Archie (MLJ) learning the ropes on house ads and production. For most of the early 1940s he bounced around the industry at Fox, Holyoke, and Lev Gleason, although Timely’s Comedy Comics #11 (Sept. 42) sports an unidentified singular “Inky Dinky” feature mysteriously signed “Sol.” By the later 1940s Brodsky was on the Timely staff and spent most of his tenure on teen humor features like Millie and Patsy Walker, while simultaneously cranking out crime thrillers for the 1949-1950 crime titles.

When the staff was let go, Sol freelanced primarily on war and spy titles for Atlas, was the artist on the “Clark Mason Spy Fighter” feature in Spy Fighters in 1951, and at some point mid-decade joined the production staff, becoming one of the handful of cover artists for Atlas, aligning with Joe Maneely, Bill Everett, Carl Burgos and Russ Heath for cover duties. Brodsky also lined up commercial comic side products for the company like The Adventures of Big Boy and The Birds Eye Kids giveaway comics.

After Atlas imploded, Sol launched Cracked magazine in 1958 and helped post-implosion Atlas artists secure work from Dick Giordano at Charlton before returning to Stan Lee in the early 1960s to do production work. He designed the logos for many of the early Marvel titles including the Fantastic Four and inked the title’s third and fourth issues. By 1964 he was on staff again as production manager and drew the occasional teen feature and western filler, as well as inking the occasional cover, his last being John Buscema’s cover to Sub-Mariner #1 in 1968.

In 1970 Brodsky left to form a new company called Skywald with Israel Waldman and returned to Marvel in the mid-1970s to spend the rest of his career pushing Marvel into new commercial endeavors outside the comic books, also appearing as the Human Torch in Jack Kirby’s What If? #11 in 1978. Well liked by everyone in the industry, he passed away in 1984, and according to his friend and fellow Timely alumnus Allen Bellman, “There was never a friend like Sol Brodsky.” [source: Dr. Michael J. Vassallo]

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